SNC Emergency Preparedness

Emergency Preparedness

Emergency information for our plant neighbors on how to respond in the event of an emergency.

 
 

Southern Nuclear is committed to the relentless pursuit of safety. That includes the safety of our employees, facilities, and most importantly, the safety and health of our neighbors. U. S. nuclear facilities are the most heavily regulated in the world, and at Southern Nuclear, we don’t just meet federal standards, we exceed them. 

As a neighbor, it’s important for you to be informed about the types of emergencies that can occur and how to protect your family.

Emergency Preparedness Information for All Plants:

  • Emergency Classifications
  • How would you know if there was an emergency?
  • Emergency Actions
  • Information for Farmers, Food Processors and Distributors

Emergency Response Instructions for Each Plant:

  • Who Is Involved in the Emergency Plan?
  • Emergency Information
  • Emergency Alert Stations
  • Evactuation Routes and Information
  • Emergency Checklist
  • How to Determine Your Zone
  • Emergency Planning Zone Map

Emergency Classifications

  1. Notification of Unusual Event - The least serious of the four NRC classifications. It means there is a minor problem at the plant. Because of strict federal regulations, many situations occur that qualify as unusual events. Unusual events pose no danger to the public. You will not need to take any actions unless directed to by state and local officials.

  2. Alert - An event has occurred that could reduce the plant’s level of safety. There should be no danger to the public. County and state officials will be involved and prepared for any necessary response. You will not need to take any actions unless directed to by state and local officials.

  3. Site Area Emergency - An event has occurred that could involve major problems with plant systems. Local radio and television stations in the area will provide information and instructions. If you’re in an affected area, you will be notified by state and local officials about any actions you need to take.

  4. General Emergency - The most serious of the four NRC classifications. Radioactive material could be released outside the plant site. State and local authorities will take action to protect the public. Sirens may be sounded and local radio and television stations will provide information and instructions. If you’re in an affected area, you will be notified by state and local officials about any actions you need to take.

How Would You Know if There Was an Active Emergency?

Siren Systems

Sirens have been set up within the 10-mile Emergency Planning Zone (EPZ) around the plant. These sirens alert residents to listen to a local radio or television station in the event of an emergency. The sirens have a sound different than fire trucks, etc.

The sirens are tested frequently, including an annual test that will be heard by residents. The sirens are activated briefly for this annual test. Residents will be notified of any audible testing in advance through local television, radio and print media.

CodeRED Emergency Notification System

The CodeRED Emergency Notification System may be utilized to contact residents by phone in the event of an emergency. It is also available as an app on your smart phone. For additional information, visit OnSolve's CodeRed.

Other Alerts

  • The radio and television stations listed on this page will broadcast a warning.
  • In boating and recreational areas, local emergency officials will sound sirens and/or use loud speakers to warn visitors.

Emergency Actions

The three actions you may be asked to take to protect yourself are called “take shelter,” “go inside, stay inside” or “evacuate.” These three actions are described in the following sections. Be sure you understand them. Officials will tell you what to do based on the type of emergency. You may be told that your area is not affected and no action is needed. Whatever you are told to do, keep calm, follow directions and minimize phone use for emergency purposes only.

If Told to Take Shelter

Taking shelter means protecting yourself by going inside a building and not breathing outside air. The building could be your house, your workplace or some other nearby building. Taking shelter will help keep you safe if there is a small amount of radiation in the air.

If you are told to take shelter, follow these steps:

  1. Stay indoors until further notice.
  2. Close all doors and windows.
  3. Turn off fans, heaters and air conditioners that use outside air. Only use your heating or cooling system to protect life or health. 
  4. Do not use fireplaces. If your fireplace is in use, put out the fire. Close dampers or any other air intakes.
  5. Stay tuned to your local radio or television stations listed on this page for more instructions.
  6. Shelter your livestock if you can do so easily. Place them on stored feed and protected water. 
  7. Do not leave your home or shelter. Stay indoors until you receive official notice that it is safe to go out or until you are instructed to evacuate your home. 
  8. If you must go outside, protect your breathing by placing a damp cloth or towel over your nose and mouth. To provide more protection, fold the cloth over several times before placing it over your nose and mouth.
  9. Children who are in school during an emergency will be cared for. DO NOT go to the school. If your children are in school and the school is in an affected zone, they will be sheltered or sent to the reception center as needed. You will be told how to pick up your children when you get to the reception center/shelter. It is important that you do not go to a school to pick up children.

If Told to Go Inside, Stay Inside

Go inside, stay inside means protecting yourself by going inside any type of building, home or business. This action will keep you safe if there is a security event occurring at the plant. There is no danger of a radiation release at this time. This action will keep you safe if there is a security event occurring at the plant.

If you are told to go inside, stay inside, follow these steps:

  1. Go indoors and stay until further notice.
  2. Lock all doors and windows.
  3. Do not drive unless it is an emergency.
  4. Stay tuned to stations listed on page 2 for updates.

If Told to Evacuate Your Home

Evacuation means that you and anyone who is with you should move to a place that is at least 15 miles away from the facility. 

  • Go first to your reception center/shelter. Reception centers/shelters are listed on page 5. 
  • Sign in when you get there to help keep track of all persons during an emergency. 

Plans have been made to give you housing if needed. You also may need to be checked for contamination. This can be done at your reception center/shelter. Look at the map on page 6, find your reception center and know how to get there.

NOTE: It is important for you to register at your reception center/shelter, even if you do not intend to stay there. This allows officials to verify you are safe and out of the area. Law enforcement officers will make every effort to protect your property while you are away. For the safety and convenience of others, alcoholic beverages, firearms and pets should not be brought to the reception center/shelter. Residents will receive instructions on where they can shelter their pets from state and federal agencies.

If you are told to evacuate, follow these steps:

  1. Stay calm. If you already know where to go, how to get there and what to take, that will help you. You will have time to do what you need to do.
  2. Stay tuned to your local radio or television stations listed on page 2 for news about the emergency.
  3. Children who are in school during an emergency will be cared for. DO NOT go to the school. If your children are in school and the school is in an affected zone, they will be sheltered or sent to the reception center as needed. You will be told how to pick up your children when you get to the reception center/shelter. It is important that you do not go to a school to pick up children.
  4. Gather what you and your family will need. You will likely have to be away from home for a few days. Take these things along if you can:
  • This website
  • Some way to identify yourself, such as a driver’s license or other important papers with proof of address 
  • Cash, checkbook and credit cards
  • Glasses, prescription drugs and other important medicines
  • Personal toiletry items (toothbrush, comb, etc.)
  • Baby supplies
  • NOTE: Reception centers/shelters provide food, bedding and other emergency services.
  1. Remember to do the following before you leave:
  • Shelter your livestock, especially dairy animals, if you can do so easily. Leave enough water and stored feed for several days. Residents will receive instructions on where they can shelter their pets from state and federal agencies.
  • Turn off all appliances except your refrigerator and freezer. Turn off lights and water faucets.
  • Lock all windows and outside doors. Law enforcement will patrol the evacuated area.
  • Tie a white cloth to the front doorknob of your house or to the mailbox. The white cloth will signal to emergency workers that you have left the area safely.  
  • Remind nearby friends and neighbors about the need to evacuate. Do not use the phone for this since the lines will be needed for official calls.
  • Use your own car if you can. If you have room, check to see if any of your neighbors need a ride. If you know someone who is physically or mentally disabled, give them a ride if possible. If you need a ride and have already sent in a special needs card, an emergency worker will pick you up. If you have not sent in the card, the radio or television will give the phone number to call to be picked up. You can also call your county emergency management agency office.
  • NOTE: Special needs cards are located on the back of this calendar. If you or someone you know would be unable to evacuate himself or herself, fill out the special needs post card on the back of this calendar and mail it now.
  • Turn on your car radio for more information.
  • Follow the route you have marked on the map on page 6. Traffic control officials will help guide you on your trip.
  • Close car windows and vents. Keep the air conditioner and heater off. It is okay to recirculate air inside the car.
  1. Drive carefully. Go straight to the reception center/shelter, even if you plan to stay with friends or at a motel. Your belongings and clothing may be checked for contamination. The reception center/shelter will record your temporary address or location.

While you are away from home, local officers will patrol the area to protect property. Officials will decide when you can go home to check on animals and to pick up other items.

When the emergency has ended, public officials will tell you through the news media when it is safe to go home.

Information for Farmers, Food Processors and Distributors

State and local emergency response officials could issue special preventive and emergency protective actions for farmers, food processors and distributors. Those instructions may include:

  • Cover outside feed supplies with a tarpaulin or other appropriate material.
  • Cover open water sources such as wells, rain barrels, tanks, cisterns, etc.
  • Remove dairy animals, poultry and other livestock from pasture. Shelter them if possible and provide them with protected feed and water.
  • Do not use fresh milk from your dairy animals, vegetables from your garden or eggs from your poultry.
  • Cover harvested crops or store them indoors.
  • Do not process or distribute agricultural products until they have been sampled by appropriate government officials and found to be free of contamination.
  • Do not engage in dust-producing activities such as cultivating, disking,
    bailing or harvesting.
  • Wash, scrub, peel or shell fresh fruits and vegetables before eating them.
  • Wash hands thoroughly before preparing or eating food.
  • If ordered to evacuate, provide plenty of food and water for your animals. Make sure shelters are well ventilated during hot weather. Farmers will have opportunities to return to their farms to care for their livestock, under supervision of emergency workers.

Emergency officials will advise you what to do based on the type of emergency and other factors such as the distance of your farm or facility from the plant and the prevailing wind conditions. Follow their instructions to prevent or minimize contamination of food products.

 

 

Emergency Response Instructions for Plant Neighbors

If you reside within the 10-mile emergency planning zone of one of our nuclear plants, please visit your respective site for information on contacts, news sources, preparation checklists, emergency routes and reception centers.

 

Plant Farley

 

Plant Hatch

 

Plant Vogtle